Massachusetts

“I work a wide variety of beautifully colored and patterned jade and prefer material with a fine creamy texture and either translucency or beautiful opacity. High quality jade is the toughest natural stone, and it is this toughness which allows it to be carved into the graceful forms I am interested in carving. From a quirk in their histories, the two stones known as nephrite and jadeite are both acknowledged as true jades. Neither is inherently more legitimate or valuable than the other. I carve both.”

“Jade is the sculptor’s gemstone, and the material itself is an inspiration. I think of my pendants as small-scale wearable sculptures to be experienced directly and intimately, bringing art and life together on a daily basis. Like many modern artists, I work in series, exploring certain ideas repeatedly, developing a vocabulary of forms, pushing, pulling, and combining them in various ways.”

“I concentrate on all-stone pendants hung on simple cords. For me there is a timeless elegance in a beautiful jade presented this way, without the interference of metal mountings. I put a lot of thought and experimentation into how the pendants hang and balance on their cords, the length of which is adjustable by means of sliding knots.”

Grey Loop
Guatemalan Jadeite Jade
Carnelian

 

 

Hand sanding a pair of gourd-shaped cups with copper tools and abrasive mud

 

 

Open Prism
Wyoming Nephrite Jade
Carnelian

 

 

White Loop
Jade
Peter Schilling
American Jade Master

 

 

Open Scroll
Wyoming Nephrite Jade
Carnelian

 

 

Installing ancient Chinese jades at the Harvard Art Museums

 

 

Olive Celt with Notches
Jade

 

A double handful of jade pendants
Dark Sage Glyph
Wyoming Nephrite Jade
Amethyst

 

 

 

Long Olive Tented Celt
Jade, Carnelian

 

 

Grey Tented Celt
Jade

 

 

 

Long Green Celt with Notches
British Columbian Jade
Carnelian

 

All photos of jades are by Bill Kipp. Jess Dugan shot the black and white portrait.